Jagriti

The first BBDiag residential workshop titled “Multidisciplinary foundation courses for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) diagnosis” took place on 11th – 15th September 2017. Nine recruited Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) and all the supervisors met at the beautiful bay campus of Swansea University, Wales, UK. Three more ESRs who have been appointed but unable to attend also joined the workshop online.

On the first day of workshop, the Vice Chancellor of the University, Professor Richard B. Davies, delivered the opening statement. In his welcoming speech to the ESRs, he highlighted the importance of interdisciplinary cooperation and scientific enthusiasm of young researchers in pursuit of innovative endeavors.

Over the next four days, fourteen subject-specific talks were delivered by the Principal Investigators (PIs) and invited experts in the field of AD diagnosis and biomarkers. The talks sparked the interest of the audience, and there was an active discussion between among the ESRs and PIs. The discussion and the interactions were aimed to provide the ESRs with a common ground for their future research and synergy.

Besides the experienced supervisors, ESRs gave a 10-minute presentation introducing their role in BBDiag project. In addition to the scientific content, the workshop agenda included a few soft-skills talks intended to enhance ESRs’ academic development and employability.

On Friday, 15th of September the ESRs had an opportunity to attend a hands-on lab session in the Centre for Nano Health at the College of Engineering, Swansea University. During the visit of this unique facility, the researchers demonstrated device fabrication and cleanroom semiconductor processing to the ESRs followed by a question-answer session at the end of the tour.

The whole group, ESRs, PIs and invited experts had an opportunity to extend their conversations over regular meals. This, together with the intensive workshop program, gave the newly recruited fellows plenty of room for the ideas exchange on prospective blood biomarkers of AD.